Modifying An AR For A Purpose: Grips and Other Accessories

Because the AR 15 is so modular and customizable, it can be made to suit a variety of purposes. Modify it to your level comfort for time at the range, swap out components and take your AR hunting, or find the right balance so you and your spouse can both safely handle it for home defense. Whatever your chosen purpose, the AR 15 can be a great firearm choice because it can be so easily modified. Even better, since only the lower receiver is technically considered the firearm, companies across the country can specialize in one or two components and not have to worry about jumping through all the hoops necessary to purchase a firearm. Ultimately, this means we can all enjoy the very best AR accessories and parts options without exorbitant prices. Of course, this also means we’re so spoiled for choice that it can be hard to wade through the multitude of options and find the one part or accessory that will fit our needs. One of the best suggestions we can offer? Find your purpose, then start your search.

 

Purpose Before Parts

AR owners choose to own firearms in general, and AR 15s specifically, for a pretty wide range of reasons. For some, it’s the best home defense option and versatile enough for all the adults living in the house to safely and comfortably handle it. For others, the AR is a great option for hunting—assuming you make modifications to chamber the right caliber rounds for what you’re hunting—because it’s easy enough to swap between different upper setups, even when you’re out in the middle of the forest. And, if you’ve ever fired an AR before, you can understand why it’s a popular firearm for range time and competitions. Of course, each of these uses is going to come with a different set of requirements, which is why it’s important to know your primary use before you dive into parts shopping. In particular, knowing your primary use will play a big role in the foregrip or handstop that will best work for you.

 

Getting a Grip

The AR 15 was initially designed for military use, which has carried over to the civilian counterpart in a lot of ways, including the standard grip and stance used when firing. Since it was specifically designed for combat use, the M16 (the U.S. Military’s name for the AR 15) needed to be light enough to carry, but structured such that the owner could go from carrying to a sturdy firing position in a snap. Even after the transition to the broader civilian market, a lot of aftermarket parts and upper receiver builds take this into account. Of course, for those who want an added level of stability, which often leads to a higher level of accuracy, a foregrip, rail scale, or handstop can be added to just about any AR with a rail system. All of these options give the user a better way to grip the forend and pull the gun snugly into the shoulder, but the best option will depend on usage.

 

How to Choose

In order to get your AR set up just how you want, even the best AR accessories can have an impact if the work counter to what you need. Take the different grip options as an example. Someone who uses their AR 15 primarily for range shooting may prefer to use a sandbag as a resting point, so that person isn’t likely to need a long foregrip for extra stability. On the slip side, someone who has modified their AR for hunting may want the added stability of a protruding foregrip to give them better accuracy when taking the shot. Fortunately, with the variety of the best AR accessories available, it’s pretty easy to get rail scales to provide a bit of extra gripping texture if you want to grip straight on the handguard. Then, if you’ll be swapping between uses, swapping out between a small handstop and a larger foregrip can be done in a matter of seconds.

 

No matter how you’re looking to customize your AR, finding the right components shouldn’t be a chore. Shop Bootleg, Inc. online for the best AR accessories and parts today!

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